My Sunscreen Mini-Review Spreadsheet

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It takes me a while to write up full sunscreen reviews sometimes, so I thought I’d share the sunscreen spreadsheet that I use to keep track of products I’ve been trying with you guys! When I have a few sunscreens that seem to make sense together I’ll put them into a full review, but I find that this spreadsheet is still really handy for me to refer to.

My Sunscreen Mini-Review Spreadsheet

A few notes on the sunscreen spreadsheet

This spreadsheet only includes products I’ve personally tried on my face. Keep in mind that my skin’s needs probably aren’t the same as yours, and the same sunscreens might not be available to you – I go through how to work out your skin type and conditions, and how to pick a sunscreen in The Lab Muffin Guide to Basic Skincare.

My personal priorities in a sunscreen:

  • High UVA protection: Australia doesn’t allow brands to show their exact UVAPF values (only “broad spectrum” is allowed), so I usually just look at the filters to try to gauge this. I prefer the newer filters (Tinosorb S & M, Mexoryl ingredients, Uvinul A Plus).
  • White cast: Needs to be minimal. My skin is NC20 for reference.
  • Ease of application: It has to feel nice on my skin.
  • Eye comfort: I need to apply sunscreen near my eyes since that’s where I can see the wrinkles gathering. My eyes are pretty hardy thanks to years of wearing contact lenses, but they’ll still water a bit with some sunscreens.

Pricing: To make the prices fairer, I’m using the price for the largest pack size under 100 g or 100 mL.

Italicised means it isn’t sold officially in Australia, so the price is an approximated conversion. Exchange rate used is 1 USD = 1.30 AUD. Note that Australia has an “Australia tax”, which is where everything is marked up a bit, so if I used a converted overseas price for the other products they would probably also be cheaper, so italicised prices are a bit lower than usual.

UVAPF: I haven’t included any non-verified (i.e. legally publicised) UVAPF ratings. I know a lot of sunscreen spreadsheets quote the value that the BASF sunscreen calculator puts out, but it doesn’t give accurate estimates since sunscreening power depends on so much more than just the percentages of active ingredients.

Ingredients: I’ve included filter percentages where they’re available. It seems like a lot of Asian sunscreens don’t need to include percentages. I’ve highlighted products with newer photostable UVA filters in green. I’ve used the shortest, most commonly recognised name for each filter, based on my highly subjective judgement. (There are a few common naming conventions – like INCI, INN, and AAN – but I went for ease of navigation in my spreadsheet rather than consistency.)

International differences in sunscreen labelling: The sunscreens are generally the Australian versions. If your sunscreen has the same percentages of filters, then it’s probably the same one – it’s really unlikely that a multinational company will reformulate a sunscreen just for the Australian market.

Also note that sometimes there are changes to SPF labelling for sunscreens sold in Australia, for two reasons. Firstly, the Australian sunscreen system simplifies SPF ratings into a few brackets – 4, 6, 8, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50 and 50+ (which means 60 or above) – so the rating will need to be rounded down to the appropriate number. Australia also has stricter requirements (TGA-approved manufacturing facilities (it’s rare for smaller overseas brands to be approved in Australia) and UVAPF ≥ 1/3 SPF for broad spectrum, which is required for higher SPF ratings). This means that sometimes the label will be downgraded to comply with Australian regulations. There are also sometimes name changes for the different markets. For example, Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Liquid Daily Sunscreen SPF 70 is sold as Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Fluid SPF 50 in Australia, and Paula’s Choice Resist Skin Restoring Moisturiser is SPF 50 in the US but SPF 15 in Australia.

Related post: What’s the deal with Australian sunscreen?

Sunscreen Mini-Review Spreadsheet

Some products were provided for review, but this is my honest opinion. This post also contains affiliate links – if you decide to click through and support Lab Muffin financially (at no extra cost to you), thank you! For more information, see Disclosure Policy.

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31 thoughts on “My Sunscreen Mini-Review Spreadsheet”

  1. Hi MichelleI I was wondering if you have a similar spreadsheet for body sunscreens? If so I’d love to see it! I’ve been using Coles Sunscreen Everyday SPF 50+ on my body for a few years now, and am curious to see how it measures up. I’ve noticed that the ingredient list is slightly different from the face version (which I also use).

    Reply
      • Please don’t unpublish the spreadsheet! It’s fantastic and so helpful. So do you use facial sunscreen on your neck and chest? I usually use two different products because body sunscreen is cheaper…

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        • Tara: I just use body sunscreen everywhere because of that, including my face.

          If I want more active ingredients (such as anti-oxidants, anti-aging ingredients) I use a serum below.

          Reply
  2. Have you tried Shiseido Senka Aging Care UV Sunscreen/Senka Mineral Water UV Essence SPF 50+ PA++++? I’m trying to decide between that and Canmake Mermaid UV Gel

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    • I think I tried the second one a while ago – I wasn’t a fan of the texture because it was too siliconey. But they may have changed the formula since then (I think it was around 2015).

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    • I was thinking of sharing the link, but I want the spreadsheet to be attached to the rest of the post so some of the shorthand doesn’t get misinterpreted! I’ve found in the past that things like spreadsheets tend to circulate and even if the link to the post is there with all the disclaimers no one reads it (hello free acid calculator, BASF sunscreen simulator), and I don’t want to contribute to misinformation.

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      • maybe you could make the spreadsheet into a photo, add watermark, and make it pop up in a new link. It’s quite difficult to follow through lol. Maybe it would look different in mobile devices, but in a desktop browser, it can be quite hard to keep up with the all the information. You did a really good job on this one though!

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        • It’s mostly for my own use and is constantly being updated, and I want it to have all the disclaimers in the post attached. I’m leaning more towards unpublishing it – I think it’s starting to become more trouble than it’s worth!

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          • Please don’t unpublish! Honestly viewing it in the website is slightly annoying, but after hearing your reasoning I totally support your choice to keep it attached to the website.

            Honestly I’m using it as a guide to help me navigate the sunscreen world, so if anything keep it how it is and update it when necessary!

            I know a LOT of people are benefiting from it being here!!! (Also again thank you for sharing it, it’s such a good tool!)

  3. This is brilliant! I love how organised you are with these reviews (make me feel a bit better about my tracking spreadsheets).

    Thanks for sharing!

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  4. Thanks for this! I love your evaluation system. Would you consider sharing a Google Sheets template for your fellow sunscreen obsessors?

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  5. Thank you for posting this 🙂 I always appreciate more sunscreen reviews!

    I wanted to ask, how do you deal with daily body sunscreen? I’m yet to find a product that’s cheap, non-greasy, and doesn’t transfer.

    In particular, how do you deal with sunscreen for the backs of your hands? I have to pee pretty frequently (courtesy of my coffee addiction) and reapplying after I wash my hands is a huge pain. And it gets a bit spend-y because of the number of reapplications

    Reply
  6. Can’t wait for that sunsense moisturising face and sunsense ultra review!
    It looks decent tho
    Anyway, I hope you consider to try and review Klairs new sunscreen (Klairs Soft Airy UV Essence) and Skin Aqua Sarafit UV Essence, because I’m quite curious about your opinion too!

    Reply
    • I don’t have the Skin Aqua yet (can’t justify buying it with so much sunscreen open) but I’m literally trying the new Klairs right now! It’s on my face at this very moment 🙂

      Reply
      • It’s okay you don’t have to rush anything to review tho?
        Hahaha it’s funny how you really using the klairs one while reading my comment? I hope it suits your skin well?

        Reply
  7. Hi Michelle! I’m from India and it’s pretty hard to get most of the sunscreens I’d want to get from your suggestions because of their unavailability or crazy high prices on Amazon. I’ve come across one here that’s called Suncros Matte Finish Soft SPF 50+ PA+++
    It’s ingedients are Cyclopentasiloxane, Zinc Oxide (micronized), C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Dimethicone, Crosspolymer, Caprylyl Methicone, Isostearic acid, Polyhydroxystearic acid, PEG-12 Dimethicone/PPG-20 Crosspolymer, Tocopheryl Acetate
    From what I’ve understood from your blog, Zinc Oxide seems to be the only sunprotectant in this for UVA and UVB. I don’t think our guidelines for product marketing are that strict here, so I don’t really know effective this sunscreen would be, specially for UVA. What’s your view of it, from reading the ingredient list?

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  8. I didn’t see Biore UV Aqua Rich watery essence. I’m curious how the UV 1 protection in that compares to other formulas.

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  9. Great spreadsheet! I am so confused about ratings. Because there are different laws and labeling in differents parts of the globe how can we really compare an Asian sunscreen against a European one? Do you happen to know more details about the Asian legal requirements in this area? I love some Asian sunscreens like the Purito ones but do have some doubts about the testing for UVA/UVB. Since you had a collaboration with them do you think you can find out more details? Thanks!

    Reply
  10. I hope you keep this spreadsheet or Google sheets up forever. I watch your videos & other people’s videos on YouTube and it’s hard to keep track of all the different products. This is helpful for when I’m actually at a store or looking online.

    The info you have on dry, sensitive skin is very helpful. I’m always on the lookout for face and body sunscreens. Many thanks!

    Reply
  11. Thank you so much for posting! I’m really excited to try Purito Centella Green Level Unscented Sun. I would love to find a sunscreen to run in. Do you know if this sunscreen holds up to sweat?

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  12. Thank you for posting! I’m excited to try Purito Centella Green Level Unscented Sun. I would love to find a sunscreen I can run in, do you know if this one holds up to sweat?

    Reply
    • Unfortunately most of these very light Korean sunscreens aren’t water resistant, I wouldn’t recommend them for heavy exercise!

      Reply
  13. The Sunscreen spreadsheet is a really good idea, and very handy. I think you should add products from the “Sun Sense” range as they too have good UVA filters. For example, Sunsense Ultra 50 + has Tinosorb S, Uvinul A + and Titanium Dioxide as well as Niacinimide thrown in. They are also Aussie made, and reasonably priced so another reason to give them some publicity. Search on Chemist Warehouse “Sun Sense” to see the whole range and active ingredients.

    Reply
  14. Hi Michelle! Thank you so much for ALL of your hard work of providing us with so much helpful information! I was wondering for Australian sunscreens would you recommend any of the cancer counsel ones for face? Heard a lot of good reviews on those!

    Reply
  15. Hi Michelle, great content! I believe the ingredient list of La Roche Porsay Au is different compared to La Roche Porsay Europe. Unforuntately. La Roche Porsay sunscreen products found in Priceline and Chemist Warehouse do not contain the ingredient Meroxyl, contrast to the ingredient list you posted in your spreadsheet.

    Reply
  16. Thank you Michelle for the great post, it is super useful! What do you think of the Ego QV Face Moisturising Cream SPF 30? I’ve tried it in the past and remember really liking it but I’m not sure if it gives enough protection. Actives: 2.5% Butyl Methoxydibenzoylmethane, 7.0% octyl methoxycinnanmate, 1.9% titanium dioxide. I use tretinoin and would really appreciate your scientific input!:)

    Reply

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