Guest Post: Aztec Secret Indian Healing Clay by Rosemarie (Every Little Polish)

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Today’s guest blogger is Rose from Every Little Polish. She’s in charge of the graphic design at the massive community group blog at Lacquerheads of Oz, and at the moment I actually work with her at my short-term day job. As you’d expect from a design nerd, her photos are spectacular and her nail art is definitely worth checking out. The recipe she’s sharing today has inspired me to make a Vitacost order, hope you enjoy it too!

Hi everyone, I’m Rose from Every Little Polish. My first true beauty obsession was DIY skincare, and long before I even knew Michelle I would read this blog and be inspired by all her science-y skincare posts. So I’m really excited to be doing this guest post to introduce you to one of my favourite DIY skincare products and recipes.

Aztec Secret Indian Healing Clay has gained quite a cult following over at Makeupalley, which is where I first discovered it. It’s 100% natural calcium bentonite clay. Bentonite clay is one of the best clays for skincare, due to its incredibly effective ability to draw oil out of the skin. I use it both as an all over face mask every few weeks, and as a spot treatment whenever I have breakouts. This is a versatile product that can be used with lots of different recipes, so first I’ll show you exactly how I use it, then I’ll talk about the variations at the end of the post. For reference, I have combination skin that gets oily around the T-zone, with occasional breakouts and congested skin around my chin and jawline.

What You’ll Need:

– Aztec Indian Healing Clay – I haven’t seen this anywhere in stores in Australia, so I get it online at iHerb (you can also get it on Amazon). It’s only $5-6 for 1 lb (450g) and because I only use a tablespoon each time, it lasts forever.

– Braggs Organic Apple Cider Vinegar (with the ‘mother’) – Apple cider vinegar is absolutely fantastic for clarifying the skin, which you can read more about in my DIY apple cider vinegar toner recipe post. I recommend this brand and type of apple cider vinegar because it’s organic, and still contains the ‘mother’ which supposedly makes it more potent. It should be a murky orange colour, with bits floating in it. You can find it at health food stores or on Amazon. Tip: Because I buy a massive 1 L bottle of this, it can be difficult to pour out the right amount. I decant it into a pump bottle which helps to dispense smaller amounts and avoid any messy spills.

– A non-metal bowl and spoon – Many experienced clay users claim that any contact with metal lessens its effectiveness, so I use a ceramic bowl and a plastic spoon. Today I’m using a ceramic Chinese soup spoon because I’ve run out of plastic spoons.

Directions:

Step 1. Place a heaped tablespoon of the clay into the bowl. Add the apple cider vinegar slowly, about one teaspoon amounts at a time, mixing to combine it with the clay into a smooth paste.

 

Step 2. Using your fingers (or a spatula or whatever you want to to use), apply it in a thin layer all over your face, avoiding the eye area.

Step 3. Wait for it to dry. I leave it on for about 1 hour (try ACV on your skin for a shorter period first to make sure your skin isn’t too sensitive). It might sting, itch, or feel like your skin is pulsing, but that sensation goes away after a couple of minutes. It will dry to a concrete-like consistency, so don’t move your face because it will hurt! This includes talking, smiling or laughing while watching a funny TV show, which is a mistake I’ve made more than once. It’s probably best to grab a sad book or watch Antiques Roadshow.

Step 4. Once it’s dried completely, hop into the shower. I don’t recommend peeling this off your face or washing it off over the sink, because it’s messy and will hurt like crazy. The best way to remove it is to let the shower water run over your face to loosen the clay. Rub your face gently in circular motions to slowly dislodge the clay, and wash it all off. I sometimes follow up with a very gentle cleanser to make sure it’s all gone.

Step 5. Be warned – your face will be red for about half an hour afterwards! So don’t use this just before you go out. It shouldn’t hurt though, so it’s fine to apply moisturiser and go about your day (indoors) as usual.

Depending on your skin type, you can mix the clay with different ingredients to suit your skin. Here are some starting points:

Apple Cider Vinegar – oily/combination/acne-prone skin
Milk or plain yoghurt – dry skin
Rosewater – dry or sensitive skin
Tea tree oil or Manuka honey – Add a bit of this if you have breakouts. I personally prefer manuka honey because it’s gentle.
Honey or glycerin – Add some if you want an extra moisturising kick. (I talk about the brilliant moisturising properties of glycerin in my DIY glycerin moisturiser recipe post.)

You can also try adding essential oils if you know your skin doesn’t have sensitivity to them.

Don’t use water, or it will turn the clay into a clumpy, gooey mess that is impossible to use as a face mask!

Because a little bit goes a long way, it’s really good value for money, and one of the most effective methods I’ve ever used to keep my skin clear. My skin always feels baby smooth and soft after using this mask, and my pores are visibly smaller. I highly recommend this to everyone, and experiment with different ingredient combinations to find the one that works for you!

Have you ever tried the Aztec Secret Indian Healing Clay? What do you think of it? And if you try this recipe out, I’d love to hear how it goes.

You can find Rose at Every Little Polish, Facebook and Instagram.

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17 thoughts on “Guest Post: Aztec Secret Indian Healing Clay by Rosemarie (Every Little Polish)”

  1. I love Aztec Healing Clay! I’ve been using it for a few years now. I love how firm and tight my skin feels immediately after, even though that goes away fairly quickly. The greatest benefit for me is all the nice blood circulation that the pulsating triggers, my face may get rid but it helps blemishes heal so quickly!

    Reply
  2. i also love the aztec healing clay and i’ve been using mine for about 2 years! The pulsing feeling is so strange and never ceases to surprise me lol but other than that the results are so good!!

    Reply
  3. Cool, this seems like a better use than mixing it with water and drinking it. I’m trying to find info on that but it’s hard to find anything amongst all the ‘live natural’ website search results which don’t seem to be based on much info except that the clay has been used for hundreds of years…

    Reply
  4. Just started using aztec and my skin looks and feels different. I have a slight breakout from time-to-time and had this stubborn acne spot on my cheek that would not go away. After using the aztec mask one time, the acne scar is nearly gone. I’m telling the whole truth. What is this stuff?

    Reply
    • It’s on iHerb – I can’t remember how much shipping is exactly but it’s around $10. iHerb has tons of other cheap stuff so you can make quite a saving if you buy a whole bunch of things!

      Reply
  5. I just bought a jar of this stuff and mixed it with glycerin and tamanu oil to make a mask. My skin is a combination oil slick usually, and I was hoping this would help. TBH it’s just a shot in the dark. I had not at all considered the pH issue with the clay. Luckily, I’ve got a hyaluronic acid moisturizer on-hand, so that might help restore things to a good place.

    Otherwise, this is a pretty neat blog you have here. It’s so refreshing to find someone who is informed about basic science when it comes to beauty.

    Reply
  6. is it okay because everytime I use this it gives different reaction. once it gets really red feel like burn because my face is so hot. I ever got itchy bumps it has big and small size, and now I feel very itchy and my face get read where it’s itchy.

    Reply
  7. I’ve been reading your blog for a while now and I love it, recommended to all my family 🙂

    I just found your post about clay and decided to try it out. So my skin burns for two minutes but then it’s ok (maybe a bit red afterwards). Now, I found mixed information on the Internet, if that’s good or bad, so wonder what you think 🙂

    Reply

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