Remington PROluxe Salon Dryer and Straightener Review

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Remington have released two styling products that promise to give salon quality results at budget-friendly prices: the PROluxe Salon Straightener and Dryer. I was lucky enough to try both of them.

Remington PROluxe Salon Dryer and Straightener Review

Both PROluxe products have what Remington call “PROheat technology”, which improves even heat distribution for more effective and less damaging styling. In straighteners, the heat of the plates drop as you glide it along cold hair, so even if the temperature is set right, you’ll still have to go over your hair a few times, causing possible uneven heating and spots with increased damage. The PROLuxe straightener uses a digital sensor to monitor the heat and immediately boost it back up when it drops for “one pass” straightening. The ceramic coating has 15 times more ceramic than a regular straightener as well to promote even heating, and is extra smooth to limit snagging. There’s also a handy switch to lock the plates closed for easier storage.

I had a wave put in my hair at Edwards and Co salon using the PROLuxe straightener – I was impressed by how quick it was, and how long it lasted (3 days with a metric truckload of dry shampoo, including 2 dance classes!). If only the straightener came with a stylist who actually knows what they’re doing and can see the back…

Remington PROluxe Salon Dryer and Straightener Review

In the PROluxe dryer, the major improvement is in the concentrator (the airflow flattening attachment, in case you don’t know what that is). In normal hair dryers, the concentrator creates hot spots at the two ends of the flattened section, but the PROluxe attachment is shaped so the heat is mostly in the centre, where you’d expect it to be. This means you get longer lasting styles and faster drying.

Remington PROluxe Salon Dryer and Straightener Review

The dryer also features ionic conditioning for less frizz, on-trend rose gold fittings and a diffuser as big as my hand. It’s quite heavy, but the weight is more in the handle and less in the head so when you use it normally, it feels a bit lighter than the ghd Air even though they’re the same weight in total according to my luggage scales. It doesn’t feel much different when you hold it by the head like a pro hairdresser.

Remington PROluxe Salon Dryer and Straightener Review

The best thing about the PROluxe products is that they’re really reasonably priced for salon-level products: $129.95 AUD for the dryer and $149.95 AUD for the straightener (as a comparison, the ghd AIR is $200 and the ghd IV Styler is $240). There’s also a 30 day money back guarantee and a 5 year warranty for peace of mind. Along with the Luxcurly Curler, these two are right on top of my hair styling recommendations list! You can grab them at your local Remington stockist.

 

This product was provided for review, which did not affect my opinion. For more information, see Disclosure Policy.

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5 thoughts on “Remington PROluxe Salon Dryer and Straightener Review”

    • Good question – it’s on the low-to-medium end. Not deafening, but I wouldn’t use it if someone in the next room is trying to get to sleep.

      Reply
      • Thank you. I’m a crazy cat lady and my current very old, very long-suffering hair dryer is very loud and it upsets my cats. Priorities dude!

        Reply
  1. Hi Michelle,

    I’m curious about the ‘ionic’ technology stuff. When I’ve looked into it before (only cursory googling, not a deep dive) I’ve struggled to get information on specially which ions it uses (if I remember my highschool chem correctly, any element or molecule can be an ion if it’s number of electrons don’t match it’s number of protons) and why ions (of any type) are good for hair. Do you have any insight on the topic?

    As always, I love your blog 😀

    Reply
    • It’s more in the physics area – it works via coronal discharge, which basically uses electricity to force anything nearby (probably air molecules) to become charged. There isn’t much good evidence of it doing anything significant as far as I know, but I haven’t looked into it much!

      Reply

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