I’m a cosmetic chemist now

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It’s been a few weeks but I realised I forgot to announce this on my blog: I’m now a qualified cosmetic chemist! 

A lot of people assumed I was a cosmetic chemist and called me that in comments and interviews (understandable, since I’m a chemist and talk a lot about cosmetic chemistry), so instead of continuing my standard practice of feeling intensely awkward and stressing over whether or not I should reach out and correct people, I decided to go and get a Diploma of Personal Care Formulation. 

Education is still my specialty and passion, so I won’t be taking up any hands-on formulation work for the time being, but I’ll continue to offer consultation services on product concepts, marketing, education, science communication etc.

Skincare Guide


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28 thoughts on “I’m a cosmetic chemist now”

  1. Reminded me of this I read on Twitter, “I waved to a man because I thought he waved at me.
    Apparently he waved to an other woman. So to get out of the awkward situation I kept my hand up and a taxi pulled over and drove me to the airport. I am now in Poland starting a new life.” 😄😄
    Congratulations on your new qualification (though I think this is just a piece of paper, you were already qualified). Wishing you contentment and joy always ❤❤❤

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  2. Hi,
    Congrats, Michelle! Well done! You didn’t really need it 😉
    Have you studied with the AACDS or the Institute of Personal Care Science? I would also like to know your opinion, please.
    A hug

    Reply
    • IPCS – I went with them on the recommendation of a number of practicing cosmetic chemists 🙂 The AACDS program looks like the same thing but way more expensive for some reason…

      Reply
  3. I really appreciate what you do for us, the readers of your blog. There is SO MUCH junk on the internet about formulating personal care and cosmetic products. As a “recovering chemist” I want to scream when I read some of that stuff! I appreciate being able to turn to you for the facts. Congratulations on your new certification!

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  4. Congratulations Michelle! <3
    Now you can avoid the awkwardness of correcting people on your titles, but honestly I always felt you're already qualified as a cosmetic chemist 🙂

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  5. You are amazing! Congratulations, it’s always fun learning and getting a new qualification.

    I really enjoy and appreciate all the content you produce. Thank you.

    Reply
  6. Hello from Madagascar 👋
    I am a big fan of your channel, i hope it’s not rude to ask where you got your formulator diploma? i have engineering degree (clean energy and stuff) but got an online degree in Cosmetic formulation to make haircare products, I’ll be very interested in continuing on learning if you have any recommendations? Meanwhile, I’m also interested in your consultation services, where can I contact you for that?
    Sorry for the long comment
    Have a great day🤗

    Reply
    • I went with IPCS, I’ve heard the SCS program is also good (but requires travel to London, which is not possible for Australians for the foreseeable future). Email is good for consultation.

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  7. Hi there Dr. Wong,

    I have a question about a special Scandinavian sunscreen you mentioned awhile ago. Forgive me, I think it was Swedish? But I can’t remember. It’s new technology that sinks into your skin and retains SPF for 6 hours?

    I desperately need this for my autistic toddler, as reapplying sunscreen is a nightmare to him and we are a skin cancer prone family.
    But I can’t find it for sale anywhere in the US or online that ships to the US!

    Help! Where can I purchase it that ships to California?

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    • It’s Evy – unfortunately I’m not sure, sorry! Maybe someone who comes across this will know, or can suggest a similar type of product.

      Reply
  8. Congrats! That’s really impressive. Now you’re even more qualified to maybe answer a question I have. 😀

    I just read that Niacinamide reduces the efficiency of AHAs if you use them in the same routine. Apparently that’s because, while AHAs work at lower ph levels, NIacinamide likes a ph level of around 5-7. But isn’t that the ph level of like, virtually all (regular) skincare products, Niacinamide or not? So is it a myth that Niacinamide and AHAs don’t like to play together? Or does that mean everything with a somewhat higher ph level reduces the efficiency of exfoliating acids when you apply it right afterwards? Or does Niacinamide still make AHAs less effective but for a different reason?

    Reply
    • You’re right, niacinamide products are pretty much the same as any other products when it comes to interacting with AHAs! Just wait 15 minutes after you apply the AHA if you’re paranoid, but I wouldn’t be surprised if you don’t see a big difference with or without the waiting time (really depends on the products themselves, but having a wait time is a bit safer I guess).

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  9. Well done Dr Wong! As a mum of a phD neuroscientist and an environmental consultant I appreciate the work gone into achieving your doctorate.

    Reply

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